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Prudery is an intellectual attitude which is inspired by prudepuritanism, which is directed against the depravity of society and condemns every kind of liberalness. Proverbial prudish is the Victorian age or the US American present age. There, the case of an actress, who got a shoulder strap of her dress accidently shifted during a television show, so that her breast could be seen for a split second, provoke discussions lasting for months.

The psychoanalysis recognised in the repressed or forbidden nudity, in the artificially induced sense of sin for the nude being the cause of numerous diseases such as depression and phobias, but also of sexual crimes such as child abuse and violence against women and children.

Is it a coincidence, that the proverbial prudery of the Victorian / Wilhelminian period led to national fanaticism and the unprecedented violence of World War I.?

Is it a coincidence, that women are still denied elementary human rights, where religion still forbids nudity?

Is it a coincidence, that inhuman terrorism has evolved as a fanatical degeneracy of a religion which proscribes nudity as a sin?

No, this is arguably no coincidence. The history and the present are full of examples, where prudery tends to turn into violence. However, the coerciveness of prudery, which is so often associated with violence and contempt for human beings, has not been investigated in conclusion.

It is sufficent to only conclude, that the condemnation and the morbid wheedling of others into sin as regards to nudity promotes, or even triggers, the tendency to mental disorder and crime in various sexual and violent offenses.

Psychoanalysis teaches us, that sexual offenders practically always had a disturbed sexual development, often have been victims themselves. The first cause of a disturbed sexual development is, however, the tabooing and the prohibition of the nudity, with which children are confronted very early, if they are not fortunate enough to have naturists as parents.